Remembrance day 1947, the scene at the Cenotaph in Whitehall when the nation paid homage to the fallen of the two World Wars. The King and Princess Elizabeth placed wreaths.

Name.
Charles Frederick Arthy.
Rank.
Ordinary Seaman, Royal Navy.
Ship.
H.M.S. Formidable.
Died.
Friday, 1st January 1915. Age 18.
Cemetery.
Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent, United Kingdom.
Name.
Charles James Arthy.
Rank.
Private.
Regiment.
H.M.S. Clan Mc Naughton. Royal Marine Light Infantry.
Died.
Wednesday, 3rd February 1915.
Cemetery.
Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent, United Kingdom.
Name.
John Frank Arthy.
Rank.
Private.
Regiment.
2nd Bn, King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regt).
Died.
Sunday, 16th May 1915. Age 22.
Cemetery.
Ypres Memorial, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
Name.
Frank Arthey.
Rank.
Private.
Regiment.
2nd Bn, Essex Regiment.
Died.
Thursday, 6th July 1916. Age 18.
Cemetery.
Beauval Communal Cemetery, Somme, France.
Name.
F Arthey.
Rank.
Private.
Regiment.
10th Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.
Died.
Sunday, 8th April 1917.
Cemetery.
Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery, Arras, Pas de Calais, France.
Name.
Reginald Rookwood Arthy.
Rank.
Private.
Regiment.
2nd/7th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers.
Died.
Saturday, 6th October 1917. Age 19.
Cemetery.
Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.
Name.
W S C Arthey.
Rank.
Private.
Regiment.
10th Bn, Worcestershire Regiment.
Died.
Sunday, 29th September 1918.
Cemetery.
Valenciennes (St. Roch) Communal Cemetery, Nord, France.
Name.
T E Arthey.
Rank.
Farrier.
Regiment.
16th (The Queen's) Lancers.
Died.
Thursday, 18th November 1920. Age 33.
Cemetery.
Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.
Name.
J.L Arthy.
Rank.
Sergeant.
Regiment.
22nd Special Air Service Regiment.
Died.
19th May 1982. South Atlantic Conflict, Falkland Islands.
The red poppy, the Flanders poppy, was first described as the flower of remembrance by Colonel John McCrae (a Canadian), who was Professor of Medicine at McGill University of Canada before World War One. Colonel McCrae had served as a gunner in the Boer War, but went to France in World War One as a medical officer with the first Canadian contingent.
At the second battle of Ypres in 1915, when in charge of a small first-aid post, he wrote in pencil on a page torn from his dispatch book:


In Flanders' fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved,
and now we lie In Flanders' fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe;
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies
grow
In Flanders' fields.



The verses were apparently sent anonymously to the English magazine, Punch, which published them under the title . "In Flanders' Fields". Colonel McCrae was wounded in May 1918 and died after three days in a military hospital on the French coast. On the eve of his death he allegedly said to his doctor, "Tell them this. If ye break faith with us who die we shall not sleep".
Research from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Rikk Earthy, April 2000.